Morgan

Writing Creative Copy for Your Escort Business

Jaeleen Creator of Bondassage’s Avatar Article by Blog Slixa Under Cover

The thoughtful advice and opinions of the author of this article are meant to be informative and entertaining and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Slixa.

Writing content for your advertising and websites can be challenging, and there are many different theories and strategies about writing great copy. In this article, I’ll be focusing on one of the most effective ways to easily develop connection and trust with the widest possible audience - by using sensory-based words.

As humans, we are hardwired to respond to and make decisions based on one or more of our five senses. Generally, we are dominant in one or two of them. For example, I am visual by nature, but I also respond strongly to sound. So if something doesn’t look or sound right, I’m immediately turned off.

Our senses play an instrumental role not only in how we connect and relate to one another but, more importantly, how we make our purchasing decisions. Using sensory-based words is a simple yet effect way to subconsciously appeal to the largest number of readers.

Let me tell you a story:

Meet Bob. He’s 49, married with two grown children, and works as a Vice President for a tech company in Silicon Valley. While his job is extremely stressful, he loves the adrenaline of working in a fast-paced and ever-changing environment. Bob earns a high six-figure salary plus substantial quarterly bonuses.

Because Bob is no longer supporting his grown children, he has a great deal more disposable income to “play” with, and play he does. Recently he rewarded himself with a new $300,000 Ferrari FF sports car that he’s crazy about. As a matter of fact, he polishes it daily with a freshly laundered diaper. Yes, it’s his pride and joy.

From the first time he laid eyes on the FF, it was love at first sight. He snagged every piece of literature he could get his hands on: brochures, DVD’s, magazines - and he spent hours researching on the web. He even turned an image of the car (in red, naturally) into his desktop, mobile phone, and iPad screensavers so he could gaze at it every chance he could.

On his first trip to the dealership he recalls walking over to his dream car to get a closer, more intimate look. When he got close enough to touch it, he did - stroking the sleek body gently, relishing in the feel of polished metal on his skin. The salesman invited Bob to take it for a test drive. The second he opened the door, the smell of the car’s interior left him breathless - it was as arousing as anything he had ever experienced.

Then he sat in the car and instantly melted into the seat. The feeling of supple hand-stitched leather against his skin was simply sublime. As he turned the key and started the automobile he imagined being in a hovercraft. The purring automobile sounded like a spaceship, just idling quietly ~ maintaining it’s holding position, waiting to take off like a rocket.

If you asked Bob what he remembered most about that encounter he would tell you the smell of the car left the deepest impression. He labeled the smell “indescribable” and it was in that moment that he realized he wanted that car so badly he could “taste it”. He would tell you the smell was all it took to seal the deal.

The purpose behind the story of Bob and his love affair with a $300K sports car is to demonstrate how effective sensory based words are. In Bob's case, smell, sight and touch are primary motivators. Feel free to use it as a template for crafting your own copy.

Sight, Sound, Touch, Taste and Smell.

In the story above, I used words connected to all five senses to illustrate how someone like Bob would be enticed to want to make a similar purchase after reading his story. Below are several examples pulled from Bob’s story. I’ve highlighted specific words and phrasing using each of the five senses.

Sight:

The first time he laid eyes on one … he snagged every piece of literature he could get his hands on. He even turned an image of the car into his desktop, mobile phone and iPad screensavers so he could gaze at it every chance he could.

Sound:
The purring automobile sounded like a spaceship, just idling quietly ~ maintaining its holding position, waiting to take off like a rocket.

Touch:
When he got close enough to touch it, he did - stroking the sleek body gently, relishing in the feel of polished metal on his skin. Then he sat in the car and instantly melted into the seat, the feeling of supple hand-stitched leather against his skin ~ simply sublime.

Smell:
If you asked Bob what he remembered most about that encounter he would tell you that the smell of the car left the deepest impression. He labeled the aroma as “indescribable.” He would tell you the smell was all it took to seal the deal.

Taste:
And it was in that moment that he realized he wanted that car so badly he said he could taste it.

What senses do your ideal clients respond to?

In the case of Ferrari-loving Bob, he said the smell of the automobile sealed the deal for him. Even though he said he had collected screensavers (sight), loved the touch of the car (touch) and heard the engine purr (sound), he said the smell is what finally sold him.

In regards to your own copywriting efforts, you won’t always know specifically which senses will seal the deal and make readers of your ads pick up the phone to call you for an appointment. Once you get into the habit of using words based on taste, touch, sight, smell, and sound, your ads and web copy will instantly connect with your readers - regardless of their primary sensory modality.

How can you create effective copy using sensory-based words?

Simple - you use two or more of the five senses to give your ad the best possible chance of enticing your ideal client to pick up the phone and book the appointment.

Let’s say that your ideal client is highly responsive to touch and sight. Here’s an example of copy that would entice him to call you over the other ads:

“Imagine walking into my candlelit room. I stand before you ~ a vision, dressed only in a lacy bra and panties caressing the curves of my creamy skin. You can practically feel me from across the room. Don’t you want to touch? The moment you lay eyes on me you know you’re exactly where you belong”.

If you want to take it deeper and add more senses you could say:

“Imagine walking into my candlelit room. I stand before you ~ a vision , dressed only in a lacy bra and panties caressing the curves of my creamy skin. The enticing aroma of exotic oils and smooth sounds of carefully selected music fill the room. You can practically feel me from across the tastefully decorated room. Don’t you want to touch? The moment you arrive you’ll know you’re exactly where you belong”.

I suggest you write down all five of the sensory words (perhaps on a spreadsheet) and look for inventive ways to use them to speak directly to the client you want to attract. In order for this exercise to be most effective you must have some sense of what appeals to your client, but don’t neglect your personal style. Play around and have fun with the process.

Make the words match your offerings and the clients you serve.  For example, if you are a Dominatrix you might write:

Imagine walking into My very dimly lit dungeon where you’re immediately ordered to get undressed, blindfold yourself and await My instructions. When I’m ready, you’ll feel My hands securely fastening smooth leather cuffs around your ankles and wrists. You won’t be allowed to see me until I deem you worthy ~ I’ve designed your experience that way. Next, I’ll place padded headphones filled with carefully selected hypnotic music designed to intensify the sensation of My hands on your body.”

You don’t have to use all five senses in your copy - select only the words that make the most sense to your offerings. For example, the word "taste" doesn’t necessarily mean placing food or other objects in a person's mouth. It could be part of a descriptive word that subconsciously evokes taste. “You can practically feel me from across my tastefully decorated room.”

Use three to seven sentences in your ad or web copy that use as many sensory modalities as possible. Create a movie in their mind in which your readers “experience” what it will feel like (and be like) to be the recipient of your services. And once that happens, their subconscious will propel them to make that a reality by picking up the phone and calling you to book an appointment. 


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